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How it works

The Parkinson Canada Research Program supports promising researchers as they discover new treatments and new ways to diagnose Parkinson's disease.

Donors become investors in early-stage, novel ideas in Parkinson's disease research
Donate now
Pilot projects and new investigators receive enough funding to get their start
Apply for funding
A concept is validated and can receive much more funding from other agencies
Past projects

Since 1981, the Parkinson Canada National Research Program has invested more than $31 million in funding for:

  • Innovative Canadian research by established and promising investigators.
  • Discovery stage research where investigators test new theories and pursue promising new leads.
  • Researchers at the beginning of their careers in order to foster the next generation of scientists studying Parkinson’s disease.
  • Novel research to build greater capacity, promote creativity and engage more researchers.
  • More than 600 awards, fellowships, and grants that teach us more about diagnosing and treating Parkinson’s disease.
More about the program

Research we fund together

No one is going to... spend on an idea we just had, but the fact Parkinson Canada was willing to look outside an established Parkinson research group [is] going to be the key to solving these problems.
Dr. Matthew Krause, Research Associate, 2020-2022 research cycle

Funding30new grants

Across5streams

Totaling$1,015,000in new investment

2019-2021 research cycle streams

All research projects

Many potential research breakthroughs are still left unfunded

Donors like you make the Parkinson Canada Research Program possible. Many of our program's most invested donors refer to themselves as venture capitalists of research into Parkinson’s disease. Yet, many worthy projects are left unfunded.

The next breakthrough could be one of them.

Your gift today increases our research funding pool and enables new projects to get their start.

Donate now